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Hear It, Share It (Part 1 of 4): Timing in Parkinson’s Disease May be Everything

During these uncertain times, now seemed the right time to share with you some words that might be of help. As we all are at home during this outbreak, I know I’m thinking about and discovering how to get back to a routine that I can keep. It isn’t easy with constant distractions. The refrigerator constantly trying to lure me, the phone ringing with robocalls, trying to work, and timing my medications – all at once – they all pull at me!

Listen to the Audio Series

So, for the next four weeks, I will be sharing a chapter from my audio book, A Soft Voice in a Noisy World – A Guide to Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease that I think might be helpful. This week’s chapter is about dealing with timing in Parkinson’s.

Timing is Important

Timing your medicine, your diet, your exercise, your sleep, and your work are a challenge that takes some self-discovery. Click the play button below to hear voice actor/narrator, Doug Gochman read Chapter 15 of my book, to get some ideas on timing:

Chapter 15: Timing in Parkinson’s Disease May be Everything

Keeping up on a simple daily regimen can feel like a full-time job in itself, and the longer you have this illness the more you’ll recognize the importance of being diligent in monitoring how you’re body is reacting to your medicines.

Karl Robb, A Soft Voice in a Noisy World

Please feel free to comment about this chapter and share your own tips on how you manage your daily timing by clicking the Leave a Comment button below. Share this post with others by clicking the share buttons on the right.

Next Week’s Chapter Hint…

The next chapter in this series deals with the dilemma of weighing the fairness of living with a chronic condition. Come back next Thursday to hear the next installment!

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A Partial History in Tees

Almost every Parkinson’s disease conference that I have ever attended, over these 30 years of going to symposiums, lectures, and meetings, almost all of them had a an associated tee shirt. Some of my shirts probably got worn out and some may have gotten lost, over time, but here is a smattering of the events that I either had some affiliation with or attended. It’s a tribute to past events and friends-some gone, but not forgotten.

I thought this video might be a good way to commemorate Parkinson’s Awareness Month. Old tee shirts can hold a lot of memories!

Please enjoy this video to see my collection of tee shirts that I picked up from various Parkinson’s gatherings. Just click this link to see the video: https://gopro.com/v/JbDZkdva0MWvg

 

 

Getting What You Need-Support

 

For the first 7 years of being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, I didn’t see a need, nor did I have a strong desire to join a Parkinson’s disease support group. When I moved to the suburbs, my neurologist, at the time, encouraged me to see what support groups could offer. After attending meetings of a few support groups, my wife, Angela, and I envisioned what we wanted in a group. In a very short period, I went from avoiding Parkinson’s support groups to speaking at them and even starting one of my own. My wife and I ran our support group for a dozen years. I learned so much from so many amazing people. As much as I thought that I didn’t need a support group, it turned out, that I really did.

The reality is that a well-run support group offers camaraderie, information, and a wisdom that comes from so many, all in one place. A support group can show you what is working and what to avoid, doctor information and feedback, available classes that pertain to Parkinson’s, local therapists, caregiver support, Parkinson’s news, and speakers in your area. When you find a good group, it feels like another family and a place that you belong. A strong network of family and friends is crucial to your health and wellness, no matter what the illness.

Some support groups may not match your personality or may not be the kind of group that you feel comfortable with, right now. I wanted a group that focused on the sharing of information and left me more empowered than when I came in. We made a lot of friends, shared both the good times and the rocky times, and provided one-another moral support. Despite our age differences and unique situations, we all learned together and bonded together into a cohesive unit for most of the group’s longevity.

We Are All In This Together

Knowing that you aren’t alone, is so important. Something as small as telling someone that you are thinking of them or that they matter to you can save another’s life. Knowing that people are thinking about you and caring about you is so empowering. Just a simple quick text, an email, a phone call, or a good old-fashioned greeting card can make a huge impact.

Care-giving has its stressful moments. We all need a break. Taking time for ourselves is not selfish-it’s a precious necessity. Your self-care makes you a healthier more helpful contributor.

Helping Ourselves Helps Those Close To Us

Patient or caregiver, there is no shame in admitting that you need help. It takes a strong person to go outside his or her comfort zone. Tell someone close to you what you are feeling and to let them find assistance for you.

I am not an expert on mental health nor am I a doctor. This is not medical advice; it is only what I have seen for over the 30 plus years of having Parkinson’s disease. I have observed friends struggle, who may have benefited from this kind of help. If you see a friend in need, reach out and offer that help. You may be saving a life.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 800-273-8255 or 988 in the USA. Go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_suicide_crisis_lines for an international list of hotlines.

 

Feeling Grateful-Happy Thanksgiving!

Being Thankful

On the morning of this chilly windy Thanksgiving day, I want to express my thanks for the support and sincere gratitude that I feel for the readers around the globe that take the time to read my writings on both this site (asoftvoice.com) and (www.parkinsonsdisease.net). I am so appreciative for family and friends. Gratitude is definitely the word of the day!

Thanksgiving reminds us that the things that we may take for granted and discount as small things in our lives, are really not so little at all. I hope that today is special for you. Please know that as I send this out to you in hope that it brightens your day. I wish you a day full of joy!

Yum!

Karl

2019 APDA Education Day in Williamsburg VA this Saturday 9/28

Online registration is still open until 9/25 for the 2019 APDA Virginia Education Day being held next Saturday 9/28 (9am-4pm) at the DoubleTree Williamsburg. April Is Disease Awareness Month!

Registration is only $25 for this day long event which includes speakers on a variety of important topics including:

-People who have Parkinson’s discussing how they live well with Parkinson’s

-Neurologists discussing how to people can live well with Parkinson’s

-Caregiver discussing tips and tricks

-Exercise panel discussing PWR!, Rock Steady Boxing, Tai Chi. Yoga and BIG

-Parkinson’s Research

-Brain Fitness

-Nutrition

and much more!

Click here for more information and to register!

 

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