Category Archives: Health

Hear It, Share It (Part 1 of 4): Timing in Parkinson’s Disease May be Everything

During these uncertain times, now seemed the right time to share with you some words that might be of help. As we all are at home during this outbreak, I know I’m thinking about and discovering how to get back to a routine that I can keep. It isn’t easy with constant distractions. The refrigerator constantly trying to lure me, the phone ringing with robocalls, trying to work, and timing my medications – all at once – they all pull at me!

Listen to the Audio Series

So, for the next four weeks, I will be sharing a chapter from my audio book, A Soft Voice in a Noisy World – A Guide to Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease that I think might be helpful. This week’s chapter is about dealing with timing in Parkinson’s.

Timing is Important

Timing your medicine, your diet, your exercise, your sleep, and your work are a challenge that takes some self-discovery. Click the play button below to hear voice actor/narrator, Doug Gochman read Chapter 15 of my book, to get some ideas on timing:

Chapter 15: Timing in Parkinson’s Disease May be Everything

Keeping up on a simple daily regimen can feel like a full-time job in itself, and the longer you have this illness the more you’ll recognize the importance of being diligent in monitoring how you’re body is reacting to your medicines.

Karl Robb, A Soft Voice in a Noisy World

Please feel free to comment about this chapter and share your own tips on how you manage your daily timing by clicking the Leave a Comment button below. Share this post with others by clicking the share buttons on the right.

Next Week’s Chapter Hint…

The next chapter in this series deals with the dilemma of weighing the fairness of living with a chronic condition. Come back next Thursday to hear the next installment!

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My Droid Neighbors

Technology really can deliver, and Starship is proving it. This marvel of technology is providing an essential service, during this pandemic. My neighborhood in Virginia is being invaded by R2D2 lookalikes carrying meals from neighborhood restaurants. From coffee to ice cream these cute droids are aiming to please. This is innovation at it’s very best! GO ROBOTS!

At about 4 miles an hour, they zip down city sidewalks on target for delivery. What a date to praise the robot invasion—May the 4th be with you to all those techie and Star Wars lovers!

Tools and Resources

This pandemic has changed the world as we know it. There is no telling when quarantining will end and what will be the new normal. I have seen a few shining positives that have brought on what I hope will outlast the coronavirus outbreak.

After over a quarter of a century of advocating to Congress about the benefits of telehealth, your doctor visit by video has become a reality out of sheer necessity. Telehealth or telemedicine can reduce stress, anxiety, rush, travel time, germ exposure, and makes it easier for the carepartner. In trying times like these, heroes arise from selfless contributors, like the dedicated men and women facing the front-line of this virus, day after day.

As distance learning and remote access to information has quickly surged, I offer you a helpful list of ongoing classes, speech therapy, singing, relaxation, exercise, and socialization. This list of resources will hopefully help you to stay active, connected, and supported. Our list is a useful array of local, national, and regional online resources that may make your day, just a little better!

It’s World Parkinson’s Day

April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month

I am 53 years old and was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease at the age of 23. I have made it my mission to provide Parkinson’s awareness through my 12 year old award winning blog, www.asoftvoice.com by sharing lessons and information related to this illness.

Thirty plus years with Parkinson’s has taught me a great deal about living well with this chronic condition.

 Here are 10 things I want to share with you about Parkinson’s disease:

  1. No two people with Parkinson’s are identical. Every patient is unique and may require a personalized treatment plan.
  2. Often, the first symptoms of Parkinson’s can be a loss of sense of smell, constipation, or wrist or shoulder discomfort.
  3. Tremor, mobility issues, and facial masking are probably the symptoms that are most identified with Parkinson’s. It is believed that symptoms may begin 10 or more years before visible symptoms might be recognized.
  4. Some people with Parkinson’s disease may show no external symptoms but can have difficulty with memory and other cognitive issues, digestion, pain, eye problems, or depression.
  5. A positive perspective, a good attitude, staying flexible, and a sense of humor can help to deal with stress and anxiety.
  6. Embracing exercise (Rock Steady Boxing), speech therapy (SPEAK OUT!), yoga, reflexology, reiki, meditation, massage, can help to reduce anxiety and stress to calm both mind and body. Don’t stop looking for a combination of therapies that work best for you!
  7. Parkinson’s disease is not an old person’s disease. I have had Parkinson’s for several years prior to my diagnosis and that was over 30 years ago.
  8. Dyskinesia (rapid, uncontrolled movement) is not due to Parkinson’s disease itself, but it is a side-effect of the medications.
  9. Protein can reduce the efficacy of some Parkinson’s medications. Consult your doctor for more information.
  10. Find a neurologist who is a Movement Disorder Specialist (MDS). They have specialized training in Parkinson’s disease.

I’ve found that by staying active and taking a proactive approach to my Parkinson’s, I’ve been able to live well, pursue my writing career and published two books, lecture, travel extensively, and continue my passion for photography. A diagnosis of Parkinson’s has not been the end for me but given me a new purpose and a new direction for my life.

A Very Different Parkinson’s Awareness Month!

In just a matter of days, our world has been turned upside down and around by an invisible and deadly invader. Many of us have turned to an online life of Zoom or Facebook Live. Whether it is for schooling, our occupation, support, workouts, weddings, births, or even funerals. Our life, from start to finish, has become a digital experience.

If we were a lonely planet before the COVID-19 virus’s rampage, our sequestering for our health doesn’t help our mental state. Socializing and getting to know our neighbors is improving and uniting us in ways not seen since WWII.

April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month! As COVID-19 continues to impact the world, it frightens me that all of us who have Parkinson’s disease are more at risk to the virus. Many of us have weakened immune systems and are susceptible to respiratory complications.

 

This Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month Has Changed

This is a Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month like no other! As our message of awareness may get muffled in the shadow of the threat of this virus, it’s important to continue to share information. Normally, awareness about Parkinson’s would be focused on informing those unfamiliar with Parkinson’s about:

  • History of Parkinson’s

  • Diagnosis

  • Prognosis

  • Parkinson’s Medications

  • Research or Therapies

Rather than offer an awareness about Parkinson’s, we should consider a more timely tact to provide an awareness about protecting ourselves from this dangerous Coronavirus! Please stay strong and maintain your physical and mental health by staying active. So, here are a few sites to keep you informed and up to date:

Please don’t take unnecessary risks. Be safe! Be careful! Be Well!

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