Don’t Label Me Or My Illness

It is ingrained in western culture not to question the authority of the doctor.  There is no doubt that doctors provide a vital and life-saving service but there are times, especially if you are dealing with life and death situations, that you have the right to question your doctor. If you rely solely on your doctor’s advice and treatment you may very well be cheating yourself of improving your condition.

Although they don’t scream it, scientists and doctors don’t fully understand the total complexity of the human body and brain. It is a lack of understanding that I believe repeals the doctor’s right to project into the crystal ball and predict a patient’s future outcome.

You must do your part in getting better.  Feeling better and getting better begins with a mind shift that you know that you can get better.  The medical community in general  believes that people with Parkinson’s only get worse–period.  They provide little hope for improving  one’s  condition and add that this illness is both chronic and degenerative.  I have yet to hear of a doctor who prescribes hope and positive  thinking to his patients.  Positive thinking and hope get people  through  amazing traumatic events every day. Feats of super-human strength in times of crisis, heroism under severe pressure, survival under extreme conditions, and the ability to push the body even beyond the breaking point are just some of the unexplained medical phenomenon that science can’t fully dissect. 

Programming can be as dangerous as it is powerful. When a patient is diagnosed with any illness and the doctor tells a patient that there is “no hope” , the negative reinforcement can have devastating consequences on the patient’s whole being.  Had the doctor said, “We have no medical answer for your illness at this time, I suggest you investigate  other potential therapies that may benefit you that western culture has yet to embrace but shows great promise.”  Of course, you probably won’t hear this from most doctors. Shifting the standard outlook from grim to hopeful  could revolutionize medicine and improve the lives of the ill seeking a cure or just a better life. There is power in keeping positive.

5 Ways To Get More Positive

1. Avoid negative influences of those around you!

Try to identify what and who drains your energy and see if you can’t change the way you interact. Learn to control stress through deep breathing, yoga, and meditation.

2. Moderate your television and media!

Avoid tragic news that only weighs you down and has any spiritual or uplifting value. Turn off reality shows that don’t make you feel inspired. Focus on you and what you can change for the better.

3. Visualize yourself getting better every day.

Seeing yourself getting stronger and having that picture in your head is a good place to start for improvement.

4. Clear your mind and body as best you can.

Finding a therapy like Reiki, massage, acupuncture, reflexology, exercise, or other modality may set you on a path to feeling better clearing out toxins in both the mind and body.

5. Help someone else.

When you help others you feel good about what you have accomplished. Making a difference in someone else’s life makes an impact on yours as well.

These are just a few ideas of how to be more positive but I’m sure that you can come up with many more.

About Karl Robb

Karl Robb has had Parkinson’s disease (PD) for over thirty years. With symptoms since he was seventeen years old, Karl was diagnosed at the age of twenty-three. Now fifty-one, he is a Parkinson’s disease advocate, an entrepreneur, an inventor, an author of two books (A Soft Voice in a Noisy World: A Guide to Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Other Health Conditions: A Workbook for Body, Mind, and Spirit) with his wife and care partner, Angela Robb. He has blogged for ten years on his website, ASoftVoice.com. He is a Community Team Member to ParkinsonsDisease.net and is a contributor to PatientsLikeMe.com. His blog, ASoftVoice.com, has been recognized four years in a row by Healthline.com as one of The Best Parkinson’s Blogs of 2018, 2017, 2016, and 2015! Healthline.com also listed the book A Soft Voice in a Noisy World in their list of Best Parkinson’s Disease Books of 2017! FeedSpot.com has recognized ASoftVoice.com for 2018 and 2017 as a Top 50 Parkinson’s Disease blog. Karl was a blogger for the 2016 World Parkinson Congress in Portland, Oregon. He is a frequent speaker on Parkinson’s disease issues as well as an experienced advocate for Parkinson’s issues throughout the United States. He is also an advisor and consultant on Parkinson’s disease. Karl is a board member of both the Parkinson Voice Project and Parkinson Social Network based in Virginia. He was an active board member (6 years) and an advocate (18 years) with the Parkinson’s Action Network (PAN). In his free time, he is a photographer, constant writer, longtime magician, and a practicing Reiki Jin Kei Do master. Karl received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has been featured by The New York Post, BBC Radio, CBS News, National Public Broadcasting (NPR), in The New Republic magazine and NHK World Television, as well as several Washington, D.C., television stations. You may reach Karl via email at asoftvoice@gmail.com, on Facebook, or contact him via Twitter @asoftvoicepd. I’m available for speaking engagements to share my experience living with Parkinson’s disease. Please contact me at asoftvoice@gmail.com if you are interested in having me speak to your group, conference/symposium, or would like me to write an article for your newsletter or blog. I am not a medical professional and this information is my personal view. I am just sharing my medical journey with you, the reader. I encourage you to seek all avenues that can benefit your condition.

Posted on November 11, 2011, in Education & Support, Health, Parkinson's Disease, Philosophy and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. I really enjoyed your post. Way to spread the word about staying positive! Your thoughts are very well communicated. I look forward to reading more of your blog.

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