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Hear It, Share It – (Part 2 of 4) – This Disease Isn’t Fair

Today’s posting is part two of the four chapters I am sharing from my audio book, A Soft Voice in a Noisy World – A Guide to Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease. This week’s chapter is about the fairness of Parkinson’s.

What is Fair?

We are all tasked with some sort of physical, mental, or spiritual challenge in our lives at some point. Some events that we face are inexplicable and hard to fathom. Often, we categorize a level of what is fair or unfair. Parkinson’s disease, for over 30 years, has taught me that as difficult as some lessons are to learn, they’ve helped me to grow.

Click the play button below to hear voice actor/narrator, Doug Gochman read Chapter 12 to hear my perspective on fairness:

Chapter 12 – This Disease Isn’t Fair

Please feel free to comment about this chapter by clicking the Leave a Comment button below. If you liked this chapter, please share this post with others by clicking the share buttons on the right.

Next Week’s Chapter…

The next chapter in this series has some ideas on how to talk with your doctor. Come back next Thursday to hear the next installment! If you subscribe to the blog today, you will receive automatic notification when the next post is released.

A Partial History in Tees

Almost every Parkinson’s disease conference that I have ever attended, over these 30 years of going to symposiums, lectures, and meetings, almost all of them had a an associated tee shirt. Some of my shirts probably got worn out and some may have gotten lost, over time, but here is a smattering of the events that I either had some affiliation with or attended. It’s a tribute to past events and friends-some gone, but not forgotten.

I thought this video might be a good way to commemorate Parkinson’s Awareness Month. Old tee shirts can hold a lot of memories!

Please enjoy this video to see my collection of tee shirts that I picked up from various Parkinson’s gatherings. Just click this link to see the video: https://gopro.com/v/JbDZkdva0MWvg

 

 

Sequestered Gratitude

If you are complaining about being sequestered at home, be grateful that you have a home and a place to reside through this craziness.

If you are arguing with your family member about who ate the last waffle, be grateful that you have the time to be with them.

If you aren’t terrified from this virus, then you aren’t alive.

If you are bored, then you have nothing to read, have nowhere to walk, made no attempt to expand your artistic acumen, are unable to access television, internet, radio, phone, or paper and pen.

If you have nothing to do while you are sequestered, then you know everything, have the perfect home, can do everything, and have achieved perfection. Congratulations!

If you are unable to just enjoy a few minutes of quiet time, by yourself, maybe you should ask yourself why this is?

If you aren’t grateful for this time with your family, dog, cat, or loved ones, it’s time, right now.

Take advantage of this precious time and savor your life at home!

Spread Love, Compassion, Care, and Kindness-Not the Virus!

Change to the highest degree is here with rampant speed. It’s a new normal for us all. Social interaction and daily life as we know it will most likely change, forever. Change can be uncomfortable and difficult to accept. Only time will tell what our new normal is going to look like.

Knowledge is Power - A Soft Voice.com

Be Careful-Be Smart

As COVID-19 makes its way around the world, it is up to us to remain vigilant as we look after ourselves, our loved ones, our neighbors, and everyone on the planet. It is terribly ironic that a pandemic can confine us to our homes, but highlights just how connected we are to one another. Rich or poor, whatever your race, gender or nationality, we are all in this together.

It is my hope that we choose to share compassion and kindness, in this time of need. This is our opportunity to reunify our nations and the entire planet. Whether you choose to deny climate change or think the Earth is flat, there is no denying this virus and the havoc that it is causing.

Take Precautions

Those of us with Parkinson’s disease may face an even higher risk than the rest of the population, so be extra cautious in your cleanliness, daily care, and exposure. Educate yourself with these important sites, in case you need more information about protection and care:
Virginia Department of Health – COVID-19
Centers for Disease Control (CDC) – Coronavirus (COVID-19)
World Health Organization (WHO) – Coronavirus disease

HOME-BOUND IDEAS

15 Ways to Improve the Lock-down

  1. Music feeds my soul and if I miss a day of my music, the day just isn’t complete! Enjoy some type of music that connects with you! Whether the music moves your spirit, your energy, or your mood, play something that moves you.

  2. Reality TV is as close as your nearest window. Too often, we overlook the inspiration of nature that surround us. It may be a brilliant sunrise, a running squirrel, or your neighbors’ dog. Appreciate the simple beauty of the day around you.

  3. Discover a new talent on YouTube. Whether you want to learn to sharpen your knives or learn to juggle or dance, you’ll find it there.

  4. Hone and expand your creativity by drawing, doodling, painting, writing, cooking, or learn a new language or musical instrument.

  5. Forgive me. They are called books. They are low-tech but they still have a place.

  6. Stay active and force yourself to keep active.

  7. For stress reduction, try to meditate and check out the App called, Headspace. This is the one that I use and enjoy!

  8. Use your technology to keep connected with family and friends.

  9. Build a new daily routine.

  10. Take special care of your animals. Don’t forget them!

  11. Look after your neighbors.

  12. Be kind, compassionate, and patient.

  13. Don’t forget how to laugh.

  14. I plan to organize my old photos and find a way to use them.

  15. Streaming services like Netflix have great content for the whole family.

These are just a few suggestions to inspire moving ahead in this trying time. Be safe and take of yourself and anyone else that you can!

I hope these suggestions are helpful. My intent is to offer some positive thought.

Getting What You Need-Support

 

For the first 7 years of being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, I didn’t see a need, nor did I have a strong desire to join a Parkinson’s disease support group. When I moved to the suburbs, my neurologist, at the time, encouraged me to see what support groups could offer. After attending meetings of a few support groups, my wife, Angela, and I envisioned what we wanted in a group. In a very short period, I went from avoiding Parkinson’s support groups to speaking at them and even starting one of my own. My wife and I ran our support group for a dozen years. I learned so much from so many amazing people. As much as I thought that I didn’t need a support group, it turned out, that I really did.

The reality is that a well-run support group offers camaraderie, information, and a wisdom that comes from so many, all in one place. A support group can show you what is working and what to avoid, doctor information and feedback, available classes that pertain to Parkinson’s, local therapists, caregiver support, Parkinson’s news, and speakers in your area. When you find a good group, it feels like another family and a place that you belong. A strong network of family and friends is crucial to your health and wellness, no matter what the illness.

Some support groups may not match your personality or may not be the kind of group that you feel comfortable with, right now. I wanted a group that focused on the sharing of information and left me more empowered than when I came in. We made a lot of friends, shared both the good times and the rocky times, and provided one-another moral support. Despite our age differences and unique situations, we all learned together and bonded together into a cohesive unit for most of the group’s longevity.

We Are All In This Together

Knowing that you aren’t alone, is so important. Something as small as telling someone that you are thinking of them or that they matter to you can save another’s life. Knowing that people are thinking about you and caring about you is so empowering. Just a simple quick text, an email, a phone call, or a good old-fashioned greeting card can make a huge impact.

Care-giving has its stressful moments. We all need a break. Taking time for ourselves is not selfish-it’s a precious necessity. Your self-care makes you a healthier more helpful contributor.

Helping Ourselves Helps Those Close To Us

Patient or caregiver, there is no shame in admitting that you need help. It takes a strong person to go outside his or her comfort zone. Tell someone close to you what you are feeling and to let them find assistance for you.

I am not an expert on mental health nor am I a doctor. This is not medical advice; it is only what I have seen for over the 30 plus years of having Parkinson’s disease. I have observed friends struggle, who may have benefited from this kind of help. If you see a friend in need, reach out and offer that help. You may be saving a life.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 800-273-8255 or 988 in the USA. Go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_suicide_crisis_lines for an international list of hotlines.

 

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