News May Have An Impact!

Hyperbole on television, the evening news, politics, the Internet, and especially late night shows, is more common than ever. Our exposure to the dramatic and the end all be all is becoming a standard occurrence. Every day we wake to a new dilemma that involves “the greatest”. “the best”, “the most tremendous”. It is a contagion that gets ratings, sells newspapers, and is the marketer’s tool of choice. Watch any infomercial pitch and you are sure to hear hyperbole.

Hyperbole is ingrained in today’s messages. Usually, the message is louder and more shocking. Drama ensues.

A few years ago, I tried an experiment to catalog the many messages that I received from viewing 2 hours of one of the cable news channels. What follows are most of the crises discussed by the news team. I’m sure that I must have missed a couple. You’ll notice that most of these topics are not of the positive nature. I think that this proves that the daily messages that we are exposed to may very well have a direct connection to our thoughts and our feelings.

Here they are:

Train bombing, Missing Dolphins that were raised in captivity, Heavy rain, City Workers Steal Donated Items for Hurricane victims, Earthquakes, Sexual Abuse of a sports star, NASCAR Fight, New Orleans Health Care Crisis, Rising Oil Prices, Missing college student, Metro fire, Hurricane evacuation, Drought, Murder, Kidnapping, Corruption in government, Sex offenders, Train derailment, oil prices, poverty, inflation, drowning, mold and spore death, robbery, plane crash, home destroyed, stock loss, computer hacking, balcony collapse, contaminated water, abandoned animals, Cancer, lack of potable water, terrorism, taxes, forest fire, thunderstorms, Space shuttle disaster, and nuclear weapons.

If this is what you hear and see in 2 hours of reporting, imagine all the exposure your brain and entire emotional system are forced to process.  If your system is compromised the negativity of these stories could have even more impact.

It might be an experiment worth attempting. Try shielding yourself from the barrage of news that is unavoidable and mostly unchangeable, to see if all aspects of your illness shows improvement. Consider a respite of time for yourself and those close to you. Maybe by doing something to counteract just one of these issues, a positive change might come.

Nothing is better than hyperbole-bad joke alert.

About Karl Robb

Karl Robb has had Parkinson’s disease (PD) for over thirty years. With symptoms since he was seventeen years old, Karl was diagnosed at the age of twenty-three. Now fifty-one, he is a Parkinson’s disease advocate, an entrepreneur, an inventor, an author of two books (A Soft Voice in a Noisy World: A Guide to Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Other Health Conditions: A Workbook for Body, Mind, and Spirit) with his wife and care partner, Angela Robb. He has blogged for ten years on his website, ASoftVoice.com. He is a Community Team Member to ParkinsonsDisease.net and is a contributor to PatientsLikeMe.com. His blog, ASoftVoice.com, has been recognized four years in a row by Healthline.com as one of The Best Parkinson’s Blogs of 2018, 2017, 2016, and 2015! Healthline.com also listed the book A Soft Voice in a Noisy World in their list of Best Parkinson’s Disease Books of 2017! FeedSpot.com has recognized ASoftVoice.com for 2018 and 2017 as a Top 50 Parkinson’s Disease blog. Karl was a blogger for the 2016 World Parkinson Congress in Portland, Oregon. He is a frequent speaker on Parkinson’s disease issues as well as an experienced advocate for Parkinson’s issues throughout the United States. He is also an advisor and consultant on Parkinson’s disease. Karl is a board member of both the Parkinson Voice Project and Parkinson Social Network based in Virginia. He was an active board member (6 years) and an advocate (18 years) with the Parkinson’s Action Network (PAN). In his free time, he is a photographer, constant writer, longtime magician, and a practicing Reiki Jin Kei Do master. Karl received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has been featured by The New York Post, BBC Radio, CBS News, National Public Broadcasting (NPR), in The New Republic magazine and NHK World Television, as well as several Washington, D.C., television stations. You may reach Karl via email at asoftvoice@gmail.com, on Facebook, or contact him via Twitter @asoftvoicepd. I’m available for speaking engagements to share my experience living with Parkinson’s disease. Please contact me at asoftvoice@gmail.com if you are interested in having me speak to your group, conference/symposium, or would like me to write an article for your newsletter or blog. I am not a medical professional and this information is my personal view. I am just sharing my medical journey with you, the reader. I encourage you to seek all avenues that can benefit your condition.

Posted on May 3, 2017, in Education, Education & Support, Media & Trends, Parkinson's Disease, Philosophy, Uncategorized, Wellness and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Alan Zimmerman

    If it bleeds, it reads.

    On May 3, 2017 17:36, “A Soft Voice In A Noisy World” wrote:

    > Karl Robb posted: “Hyperbole on television, the evening news, politics, > the Internet, and especially late night shows, is more common than ever. > Our exposure to the dramatic and the end all be all is becoming a standard > occurrence. Every day we wake to a new dilemma that in” >

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