Blog Archives

ZOOM Is Changing The Way We Communicate

I really like using Zoom for meetings, but a month ago I saw what can happen when security measures are not taken. I was Zoomed.

Illustration of computer with multiple human likenesses.
Image: istockphoto.com

 A month ago, I had a day that would unexpectedly burn disturbing images in both my brain and my wife’s brain. I was attending someone else’s Zoom social get together. It is difficult to forget. It was a shock.

What began as a charming get together of sharing and caring amongst people with Parkinson’s disease and their caregivers/carepartners, did not end well. It turned into an invasion of indecency and pure smut. A hacker’s prank or an experiment in disruption, spoiled the event for all who were involved. This was a gross abuse of technology.

When used properly and measures are taken, Zoom calls can be very helpful, enjoyable, and productive events. Follow these suggestions and keep your software up-to-date to keep out uninvited participants.

If you or your group use Zoom for a meeting, a get together, or lectures, make sure that you take caution and follow some of these precautionary steps to protect from being interrupted by unwanted attendees, to your event.

Zoom Hints For Attendees/Participants:

  • Use the “art of the pause” when participating so others can respond to your comments.
  • Be patient for speakers who may speak more slowly.
  • Make sure you upgrade your Zoom application to the latest version to get important updates.

Zoom Hints For Hosts:

  • Always password protect your meetings.
  • In your meeting setup, turn off screen sharing for participants as a security measure.
  • Use the waiting room so you can screen who is admitted.
  • Have attendee’s audio and video muted as they enter the room, so it is not distracting. Muted audio can help a lot for those late arrivals who might interrupt a meeting in progress.
  • Always greet your attendees as they enter and say goodbye when they leave.
  • Make sure you have the latest updated version of the Zoom application.

Informative Zoom Videos to Watch:

Share these resources with anyone you know who is a Zoom user or moderator. One of these sources may help keep you and your attendees stay safe.

A Day of Parkinson’s Education in Williamsburg

Last Saturday, my wife, Angela and I had the great privilege to address over 300 people with Parkinson’s and their carepartners/caregivers in beautiful and historic Williamsburg, VA at the American Parkinson Disease Association (APDA) Virginia Education Day.  This event was hosted by the APDA Hampton Roads Chapter and the APDA Richmond Metro Chapter.

Knowledge is Power - A Soft Voice.com

Angela and I participated in a couples talk with Charlie and Cammy Bryan, who are well known for their state-wide work, writing and advocacy. We really enjoyed working with them! The moderator, Don Bradway, knows both couples and did a masterful job of getting us to talk about our lives, perspectives on Parkinson’s disease, and our philosophy on living well with Parkinson’s. We got to meet so many amazing people who are living well with Parkinson’s!

Neurologists from around Virginia did an informative panel on understanding, managing, and living with Parkinson’s disease. My friend and fellow advocate, Bob Pearson did a talk with a neurologist on the importance of clinical trials and his experiences in participating in these studies. A clinical dietitian, Ms. Ka Wong from Hunter Holmes McGuire Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center in Richmond did a very informative talk on inflammation and diet.

The final breakout, held concurrently with the caregiving session, was a panel introduction to the benefits of a variety of therapies including PWR!, Rock Steady Boxing, Yoga, LSVT/BIG and SPEAKOUT!, and Tai Chi! My wife attended the caregiver session which was a panel discussion with three family caregivers. This panel shared their experiences on a variety of caregiver issues, provided informational tips and offered resources.

What was unique about this conference was the variety of people sharing their knowledge with our Parkinson’s community – those living with Parkinson’s, the medical community, allied health professionals and more. This event happens every other year and brings Virginia’s Parkinson’s community together to review the developments in Parkinson’s disease, to inform, to inspire, and to educate.

2019 APDA Education Day in Williamsburg VA this Saturday 9/28

Online registration is still open until 9/25 for the 2019 APDA Virginia Education Day being held next Saturday 9/28 (9am-4pm) at the DoubleTree Williamsburg. April Is Disease Awareness Month!

Registration is only $25 for this day long event which includes speakers on a variety of important topics including:

-People who have Parkinson’s discussing how they live well with Parkinson’s

-Neurologists discussing how to people can live well with Parkinson’s

-Caregiver discussing tips and tricks

-Exercise panel discussing PWR!, Rock Steady Boxing, Tai Chi. Yoga and BIG

-Parkinson’s Research

-Brain Fitness

-Nutrition

and much more!

Click here for more information and to register!

 

Health Union’s Living With podcast features Karl and Angela Robb

Angela and I have been contributing articles to ParkinsonsDisease.net for almost two years. Health Union (HU)’s mission is to inspire people to live better with challenging health conditions. The HU Living With podcast this week is from an interview we did last year at their headquarters.

You can find the podcast on:

Health Union Living With podcast

Health Union’s Living With podcast

In this podcast, we discuss relationships, living well with Parkinson’s disease, and a few tidbits that we have learned. Angela and Karl Robb have been married over 20 years and Karl has had Parkinson’s disease for over 30 years. Hear their outlook on illness and keeping positive.

Back To School?

 

Never stop learning!

Never stop learning!

 

Back To School
A phrase or term in the English language that makes young people shudder and hide when heard. To parents it means a return to normalcy and yet it means more carpooling, drop-offs, early mornings, and late nights.
We are all constantly back to school. Once we stop educating ourselves, we limit our potential. Always be back to school!

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