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Mask It

Once again, this pandemic shows that without severe caution and diligence, it will escalate with ease. This virus is not a joke and it is not just going to go away, like magic. People all over are dying, many have died due to the stubbornness and attitude that wearing a mask, or not, is about rights. Rights are about the common good, and right now, the common good for all of us is to avoid the spread of the coronavirus, to anyone. It is not just about you. We are all in this fight, together. Wear your mask for everyone’s sake!

The number of infected and deaths from COVID-19 are staggering. If a mask means life or death, there really is no logical excuse for not wearing one.

Feel free to share this graphic on social media or with anyone you feel is on the fence of whether to wear a mask or not. If you expose someone who has a chronic health condition to the virus, you are putting them at great health risk.

Please have a safe and masked 4th of July!

Does Masking Have A New Meaning?

Mask Up!

There is a common, unfunny, and overused joke about not playing poker with people who have Parkinson’s disease because many of us have reduced facial movement and it can be hard to read our expressions. This is masking, as I understand it. Sometimes the muscles for smiling just do not work well. Speech clarity and projection are vital to being understood. Being heard under a cloth mask when one has voice issues makes life frustrating for both the speaker and the listener.

Now, to make matters more of a challenge, add practicing social distancing, having a problem with your speech, having a softer voice, and placing a mask over that soft voice.  For someone with Parkinson’s disease, the combination of muffling the mouth, relying on just the eyes can be deceptive, and poor vocal projection, all add up to not being easily understood and worsens communications.

For some of us with Parkinson’s disease, our eyes are not as expressive or fluid as we would like, added to the tightening of facial, neck, and jaw muscles. Dry mouth, too much saliva, swallowing issues, and dental problems can all contribute to someone with Parkinson’s speech challenges.

Sight and Sound are Covered

Communication in a marriage is crucial and in this new COVID-19 pandemic of being home sequestered, the sharing of information is close and continuous. To maintain human interaction with family and friends by phone or new social technologies, takes a little practice.

Be sure that while under the fabric facial mask, (if your jaw is ok), to move your mouth, lips, and jaw. Exercising the facial muscles can add to your expressions. Do not just hide your face under the mask. Remember that you are going to have to speak louder, slower, and clearer, especially, with a mask covering your mouth. One more challenge to tackle. We can do it!

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