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Hear It, Share It – Positive Daily Living (Part 4 of 4)

I hope that you enjoy this last installment (4 of 4) in the Hear It, Share It series where you can listen to chapters of my audiobook (for free/no download).

Chapter 29 of my book,
A Soft Voice in a Noisy World, is Positive Daily Living. The chapter offers some fresh perspectives and numerous suggestions on how we might make some changes in our daily lives. Voice actor, Doug Gochman does a wonderful job in expressing my words on the audio book.

Chapter 29 – Positive Daily Living – A Soft Voice in a Noisy World by Karl Robb

Listen to the Series

If you missed the first three parts of the series, you can use these links to go back and listen:
Part 1: Timing in Parkinson’s Disease May be Everything
Part 2: This Disease Isn’t Fair
Part 3: How to Talk to Doctors

Please feel free to comment about this chapter by clicking the Leave a Comment button below. Share this post with others by clicking the share buttons on the right.

If you want to hear more of the book, the audio book is available where most audio books are sold. Here’s a link to the Audible/Amazon version. If you still use CDs, you can either order online via our Square store or email us to order the 4 CD collection!

Hear It, Share It – How to Talk to Doctors (Part 3 of 4)

Knowledge is Power - A Soft Voice.com

It’s week 3 in my Hear It, Share It series. My goal for this series was to share some chapters of my audiobook (for free/no download) with you in hopes to help during this Coronoavirus pandemic. I hope you’ve enjoyed listening to these chapters and found something to take away!

Even though my book with this chapter was released in 2012, the information remains timely and pertinent for telehealth visits as well as in-person appointments. Making a connection with your physician(s) can build a rapport that is less stressful and reduces the usual doctor visit anxiety. Click the play button below to hear voice actor/narrator, Doug Gochman read Chapter 9:

If you missed the first two parts of the series, you can use these links to go back and listen:

Part 1: Timing in Parkinson’s Disease May be Everything
Part 2: This Disease Isn’t Fair

Please feel free to comment about this chapter and share your own tips on how you talk with your doctor(s) by clicking the Leave a Comment button below. Share this post with others by clicking the share buttons on the right.

Come back next Thursday to hear the final installment in this audiobook sharing series! If you subscribe to the blog today, you will receive automatic notification when the next post is released.


I am not a doctor and this is not medical advice. This is my personal opinion that I’ve developed as I’ve lived with Parkinson’s disease for over 30 years.

Getting What You Need-Support

 

For the first 7 years of being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, I didn’t see a need, nor did I have a strong desire to join a Parkinson’s disease support group. When I moved to the suburbs, my neurologist, at the time, encouraged me to see what support groups could offer. After attending meetings of a few support groups, my wife, Angela, and I envisioned what we wanted in a group. In a very short period, I went from avoiding Parkinson’s support groups to speaking at them and even starting one of my own. My wife and I ran our support group for a dozen years. I learned so much from so many amazing people. As much as I thought that I didn’t need a support group, it turned out, that I really did.

The reality is that a well-run support group offers camaraderie, information, and a wisdom that comes from so many, all in one place. A support group can show you what is working and what to avoid, doctor information and feedback, available classes that pertain to Parkinson’s, local therapists, caregiver support, Parkinson’s news, and speakers in your area. When you find a good group, it feels like another family and a place that you belong. A strong network of family and friends is crucial to your health and wellness, no matter what the illness.

Some support groups may not match your personality or may not be the kind of group that you feel comfortable with, right now. I wanted a group that focused on the sharing of information and left me more empowered than when I came in. We made a lot of friends, shared both the good times and the rocky times, and provided one-another moral support. Despite our age differences and unique situations, we all learned together and bonded together into a cohesive unit for most of the group’s longevity.

We Are All In This Together

Knowing that you aren’t alone, is so important. Something as small as telling someone that you are thinking of them or that they matter to you can save another’s life. Knowing that people are thinking about you and caring about you is so empowering. Just a simple quick text, an email, a phone call, or a good old-fashioned greeting card can make a huge impact.

Care-giving has its stressful moments. We all need a break. Taking time for ourselves is not selfish-it’s a precious necessity. Your self-care makes you a healthier more helpful contributor.

Helping Ourselves Helps Those Close To Us

Patient or caregiver, there is no shame in admitting that you need help. It takes a strong person to go outside his or her comfort zone. Tell someone close to you what you are feeling and to let them find assistance for you.

I am not an expert on mental health nor am I a doctor. This is not medical advice; it is only what I have seen for over the 30 plus years of having Parkinson’s disease. I have observed friends struggle, who may have benefited from this kind of help. If you see a friend in need, reach out and offer that help. You may be saving a life.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 800-273-8255 or 988 in the USA. Go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_suicide_crisis_lines for an international list of hotlines.

 

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