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Losing An American Treasure—The Loss of John Prine

The 2020 pandemic has robbed us of my favorite living musician, the great John Prine. I have seen John Prine at least a half dozen times, bought most of his albums, and tried to spread the word of his timeless music. I never left a John Prine concert disappointed. Prine wasn’t just an outstanding performer but known as one of the best song writers by his peers.

A former mail carrier and song writer in Chicago, discovered by Roger Ebert and help from Kris Kristofferson, at different times, Prine gained recognition and a recording contract in 1971. Although Prine’s songs didn’t make it to major “pop success”, he had a large following and continued to successfully sell out concert venues and release albums. He had a large and loyal following of fans!

Performer and Songwriter

Songs like It’s A Big Old Goofy World, Paradise, Flag Decal, Sam Stone, Everybody, Dear Abby, Let’s Talk Dirty in Hawaiian, and I Guess They Ought a Name a Drink After You, are but a few of Prine’s tunes that will keep you humming. His music style of folk, country, rockabilly, blues, and jazz is one not to be replicated. We have lost a treasure.

Artists like Johnny Cash, Kacey Musgraves, Bonnie Raitt, and numerous other artists performed John Prine music or paid tribute to his remarkable works. Prine was the first entertainer to play at the Library of Congress and received numerous accolades for his music and for his contribution to the music industry. At last, John Prine was recognized by the industry that his fans had recognized for so long.

I read somewhere, years ago, that John Prine would write a song a day. He had many different sounds as the tastes for music changed through the decades. His smooth smoky vocals (altered over the years from his bouts with cancer, yet he sounded great), his catchy rhymes and phrases, and his melodic guitar chords made for pure genius! If you aren’t familiar with John Prine and you love music, I encourage you to discover John Prine and add him to your playlist, today! This is a huge loss to the world of wonderful music. Celebrate the life and music of John Prine!

Sequestered Gratitude

If you are complaining about being sequestered at home, be grateful that you have a home and a place to reside through this craziness.

If you are arguing with your family member about who ate the last waffle, be grateful that you have the time to be with them.

If you aren’t terrified from this virus, then you aren’t alive.

If you are bored, then you have nothing to read, have nowhere to walk, made no attempt to expand your artistic acumen, are unable to access television, internet, radio, phone, or paper and pen.

If you have nothing to do while you are sequestered, then you know everything, have the perfect home, can do everything, and have achieved perfection. Congratulations!

If you are unable to just enjoy a few minutes of quiet time, by yourself, maybe you should ask yourself why this is?

If you aren’t grateful for this time with your family, dog, cat, or loved ones, it’s time, right now.

Take advantage of this precious time and savor your life at home!

A Very Different Parkinson’s Awareness Month!

In just a matter of days, our world has been turned upside down and around by an invisible and deadly invader. Many of us have turned to an online life of Zoom or Facebook Live. Whether it is for schooling, our occupation, support, workouts, weddings, births, or even funerals. Our life, from start to finish, has become a digital experience.

If we were a lonely planet before the COVID-19 virus’s rampage, our sequestering for our health doesn’t help our mental state. Socializing and getting to know our neighbors is improving and uniting us in ways not seen since WWII.

April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month! As COVID-19 continues to impact the world, it frightens me that all of us who have Parkinson’s disease are more at risk to the virus. Many of us have weakened immune systems and are susceptible to respiratory complications.

 

This Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month Has Changed

This is a Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month like no other! As our message of awareness may get muffled in the shadow of the threat of this virus, it’s important to continue to share information. Normally, awareness about Parkinson’s would be focused on informing those unfamiliar with Parkinson’s about:

  • History of Parkinson’s

  • Diagnosis

  • Prognosis

  • Parkinson’s Medications

  • Research or Therapies

Rather than offer an awareness about Parkinson’s, we should consider a more timely tact to provide an awareness about protecting ourselves from this dangerous Coronavirus! Please stay strong and maintain your physical and mental health by staying active. So, here are a few sites to keep you informed and up to date:

Please don’t take unnecessary risks. Be safe! Be careful! Be Well!

Spread Love, Compassion, Care, and Kindness-Not the Virus!

Change to the highest degree is here with rampant speed. It’s a new normal for us all. Social interaction and daily life as we know it will most likely change, forever. Change can be uncomfortable and difficult to accept. Only time will tell what our new normal is going to look like.

Knowledge is Power - A Soft Voice.com

Be Careful-Be Smart

As COVID-19 makes its way around the world, it is up to us to remain vigilant as we look after ourselves, our loved ones, our neighbors, and everyone on the planet. It is terribly ironic that a pandemic can confine us to our homes, but highlights just how connected we are to one another. Rich or poor, whatever your race, gender or nationality, we are all in this together.

It is my hope that we choose to share compassion and kindness, in this time of need. This is our opportunity to reunify our nations and the entire planet. Whether you choose to deny climate change or think the Earth is flat, there is no denying this virus and the havoc that it is causing.

Take Precautions

Those of us with Parkinson’s disease may face an even higher risk than the rest of the population, so be extra cautious in your cleanliness, daily care, and exposure. Educate yourself with these important sites, in case you need more information about protection and care:
Virginia Department of Health – COVID-19
Centers for Disease Control (CDC) – Coronavirus (COVID-19)
World Health Organization (WHO) – Coronavirus disease

HOME-BOUND IDEAS

15 Ways to Improve the Lock-down

  1. Music feeds my soul and if I miss a day of my music, the day just isn’t complete! Enjoy some type of music that connects with you! Whether the music moves your spirit, your energy, or your mood, play something that moves you.

  2. Reality TV is as close as your nearest window. Too often, we overlook the inspiration of nature that surround us. It may be a brilliant sunrise, a running squirrel, or your neighbors’ dog. Appreciate the simple beauty of the day around you.

  3. Discover a new talent on YouTube. Whether you want to learn to sharpen your knives or learn to juggle or dance, you’ll find it there.

  4. Hone and expand your creativity by drawing, doodling, painting, writing, cooking, or learn a new language or musical instrument.

  5. Forgive me. They are called books. They are low-tech but they still have a place.

  6. Stay active and force yourself to keep active.

  7. For stress reduction, try to meditate and check out the App called, Headspace. This is the one that I use and enjoy!

  8. Use your technology to keep connected with family and friends.

  9. Build a new daily routine.

  10. Take special care of your animals. Don’t forget them!

  11. Look after your neighbors.

  12. Be kind, compassionate, and patient.

  13. Don’t forget how to laugh.

  14. I plan to organize my old photos and find a way to use them.

  15. Streaming services like Netflix have great content for the whole family.

These are just a few suggestions to inspire moving ahead in this trying time. Be safe and take of yourself and anyone else that you can!

I hope these suggestions are helpful. My intent is to offer some positive thought.

Trying to Process Shock, Loss, and Grief

I didn’t see it coming and the shock that I feel is one full of confusion and sadness. Saturday night, our 11-year-old Chocolate Labrador, Lily, jumped off the couch for her late walk, but her eyes were unclear, her head was unsteady, and her breathing seemed shallow. We think she may have experienced a seizure. When your chronically hungry lab turns down an offering of a treat or a hunk of cheese, your warning sign has been activated. Lily was a canine vacuum, so when she turned down anything close to being edible, there is an emergency pending.

Thinking that you are flexible and easy-going can be dramatically different until, you are challenged.  Life has a way of sneaking in unexpected setbacks that knock your feet out from under you.  We recently experienced the challenge after picking up the flu, following almost a month-long trek through the southeast. This strain of the flu knocked us on our butts, hard. It lasted far longer than we had expected. Our loyal lab, Lily, helped us mend and kept us company, the whole time. She was our nurse and companion through the coughing fits. She wanted to make everything okay. She was selfless!

Angela and I were in crisis mode. We rushed Lily to the 24-hour emergency veterinary clinic. It was early on Sunday morning. Tired and scared is a bad combination, especially when you are worried about the fate of someone you love.

Lily was an exceptional dog, with great intelligence, and a stubbornness for chewing sticks and sometimes eating them. We just assumed that a stick had lodged somewhere, causing her discomfort or a blockage of some kind. Other than this new development, Lily had shown excellent health and vigor for a dog of her age. She looked spry and active and never missed a meal or a treat.

Motivation

 

Lily was a sensitive and caring dog. At first encounter when you met Lily you would see her lip raise and her teeth would come out—some saw a snarl, but if you knew her and her nature, you saw her smile. She greeted everyone with her welcoming smile. Her smile brought so much joy to so many, especially us.

It was close to midnight on Sunday morning at the emergency vet, when Lily tried to smile at her doctor but was only able to make a partial lip raise. She really tried. Her tail wagged and she searched for a greeting, but the energy just wasn’t there.

Our emergency vet was a young man in his early thirties. He was a very gentle and accommodating doctor who bonded immediately with the ailing Lily and her anxious parents. We explained our situation to the doctor. He told us he would scan Lily to check her insides for any possible cause for her discomfort.

Ten minutes after he had left the room, he returned with devastating news that she was bleeding in her heart due to a cancerous tumor. Her options were not fair to her and we were left with no choice but to give her a peaceful sendoff. We would not be taking her home again. It happened so fast and at around 1:00 AM in the morning.

 Trying to comprehend the situation and the sheer rapid pace of information and decisions that were being flung our way took all our concentration and strength. Our energy was drained, and our emotions were overwhelmed. We were not prepared for what the universe was doing to Lily and us and the speed with which it was happening. Lily was gone by 4:15 AM. All that I can say is it was a peaceful death. She didn’t suffer.

Dealing with the death of those who are close to us doesn’t get any easier with age. We are still in shock. The pain may dissipate over time, but it will never go away entirely. There are at least half a dozen places in the world that I don’t want to go– one of the top places is the emergency vet in the very early morning /late night hours, or at all.

We are so grateful for the emergency vets’ efficiency, compassion, patience, and kindness. He made a very tough situation much easier when it could have been even more difficult. As hard as losing Lily has been, we see a positive in the wonderful care that she received and the tenderness that we all were shown. There was no way to prepare for this shocking experience but together we will support each other to get through this difficult time.

We miss her so much!

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