ZOOM Is Changing The Way We Communicate

I really like using Zoom for meetings, but a month ago I saw what can happen when security measures are not taken. I was Zoomed.

Illustration of computer with multiple human likenesses.
Image: istockphoto.com

 A month ago, I had a day that would unexpectedly burn disturbing images in both my brain and my wife’s brain. I was attending someone else’s Zoom social get together. It is difficult to forget. It was a shock.

What began as a charming get together of sharing and caring amongst people with Parkinson’s disease and their caregivers/carepartners, did not end well. It turned into an invasion of indecency and pure smut. A hacker’s prank or an experiment in disruption, spoiled the event for all who were involved. This was a gross abuse of technology.

When used properly and measures are taken, Zoom calls can be very helpful, enjoyable, and productive events. Follow these suggestions and keep your software up-to-date to keep out uninvited participants.

If you or your group use Zoom for a meeting, a get together, or lectures, make sure that you take caution and follow some of these precautionary steps to protect from being interrupted by unwanted attendees, to your event.

Zoom Hints For Attendees/Participants:

  • Use the “art of the pause” when participating so others can respond to your comments.
  • Be patient for speakers who may speak more slowly.
  • Make sure you upgrade your Zoom application to the latest version to get important updates.

Zoom Hints For Hosts:

  • Always password protect your meetings.
  • In your meeting setup, turn off screen sharing for participants as a security measure.
  • Use the waiting room so you can screen who is admitted.
  • Have attendee’s audio and video muted as they enter the room, so it is not distracting. Muted audio can help a lot for those late arrivals who might interrupt a meeting in progress.
  • Always greet your attendees as they enter and say goodbye when they leave.
  • Make sure you have the latest updated version of the Zoom application.

Informative Zoom Videos to Watch:

Share these resources with anyone you know who is a Zoom user or moderator. One of these sources may help keep you and your attendees stay safe.

About Karl Robb

Karl Robb has had Parkinson’s disease (PD) for over thirty years. With symptoms since he was seventeen years old, Karl was diagnosed at the age of twenty-three. Now fifty-one, he is a Parkinson’s disease advocate, an entrepreneur, an inventor, an author of two books (A Soft Voice in a Noisy World: A Guide to Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Other Health Conditions: A Workbook for Body, Mind, and Spirit) with his wife and care partner, Angela Robb. He has blogged for ten years on his website, ASoftVoice.com. He is a Community Team Member to ParkinsonsDisease.net and is a contributor to PatientsLikeMe.com. His blog, ASoftVoice.com, has been recognized four years in a row by Healthline.com as one of The Best Parkinson’s Blogs of 2018, 2017, 2016, and 2015! Healthline.com also listed the book A Soft Voice in a Noisy World in their list of Best Parkinson’s Disease Books of 2017! FeedSpot.com has recognized ASoftVoice.com for 2018 and 2017 as a Top 50 Parkinson’s Disease blog. Karl was a blogger for the 2016 World Parkinson Congress in Portland, Oregon. He is a frequent speaker on Parkinson’s disease issues as well as an experienced advocate for Parkinson’s issues throughout the United States. He is also an advisor and consultant on Parkinson’s disease. Karl is a board member of both the Parkinson Voice Project and Parkinson Social Network based in Virginia. He was an active board member (6 years) and an advocate (18 years) with the Parkinson’s Action Network (PAN). In his free time, he is a photographer, constant writer, longtime magician, and a practicing Reiki Jin Kei Do master. Karl received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has been featured by The New York Post, BBC Radio, CBS News, National Public Broadcasting (NPR), in The New Republic magazine and NHK World Television, as well as several Washington, D.C., television stations. You may reach Karl via email at asoftvoice@gmail.com, on Facebook, or contact him via Twitter @asoftvoicepd. I’m available for speaking engagements to share my experience living with Parkinson’s disease. Please contact me at asoftvoice@gmail.com if you are interested in having me speak to your group, conference/symposium, or would like me to write an article for your newsletter or blog. I am not a medical professional and this information is my personal view. I am just sharing my medical journey with you, the reader. I encourage you to seek all avenues that can benefit your condition.

Posted on June 18, 2020, in 2020, Education, Education & Support, Media & Trends, self care, support groups and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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